Friday, May 29, 2015

We met with different members of the media at MUBS University with Drake students and MUBS students. It was very interesting to hear about the different types of media from professionals, and to see the differences between public and private media. The media is growing in Uganda and is creating a bigger impact on the people. For example before 1992 there was only one radio station and now there are 270 radio stations. We learned that radio is the biggest form of radio because they have a population of 34 mil and only about 100,000 newspapers are sold a day because of price. Overall we were able to learn about how different the media is in Uganda and how progressed we are in America.

8 comments:

  1. I thought it was also surprising how the division in newspapers affected culture and the citizens of Uganda. Depending on what newspaper you read, it can influence you in many different ways. For instance, the government owned newspaper (New Vision) isn't allowed to report anything that questions or disrespects government. However, the independent newspaper company (Daily Monitor) is allowed to due this and has greater opinion on issues.

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  2. I was definitely surprised to hear that radio is the leading media in the country. I often forget that the radio is a form of communication, and a means of spreading the news and political information. It is not used for this as often in the United States as it is in Uganda.

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  3. I also thought it was interesting to see how the government played quite a role in the media. Though none of the speakers went right out and said it, the government greatly regulates what goes in and what doesn't make it into the papers. If someone writes a story that opposes the government, one speaker hinted that law enforcements will show up and "suggest" that story doesn't get printed. The corruption in the government even makes its way into the media.

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  4. Learning about the media was very interesting. To hear that newspaper and radio were their biggest forms of media was a bit shocking to me. Simply comparing our role of media in the United States to Uganda, was very different since those are not our main forms of media. The government role that played in the media with such restrictions on what is published was surprising as well. Come election time in the United States, so much is found out through the media about elections that having Uganda not really have that right was interesting to learn about.

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  6. Learning about the importance of media really shocked me! More people are moving towards radios as the cost for newspapers are expensive. It was very interesting to see how one of the individuals was an entrepreneur as he began a new tabloid newspaper company. Many people in Uganda seem to be more interested in the government than pop-culture news, which is really surprising! The government silently still seemed to control the air ways because they bought air-time for political campaigns. It will be interesting to see how the radio will develop in Uganda!

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  7. I thought it was insane how much work goes into the media here in Uganda. There are so many steps that are necessary by so many different groups of people to make the stories reliable. I found it amusing when there was people from the different newspapers talking (because they all have different views). After purchasing a New Vision and The Tabloid, it was very obvious what one was government checked. For example, there was an article talking about Martyrs Day and the New Vision (Government) shared how eventful the day was and showed many wonderful photos, whereas The Tabloid talked about how a 45 year old woman had died at the event. Overall, it was wonderful hearing the speakers discuss their views and how the media is shared throughout the large population.

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  8. Hannah, I was also intrigued by the popularity of radio and newspaper Ugandan media in comparison to the forms of media that are popular in the United States. I was also shocked by the extent of the role of the government in media in Uganda.

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